Robot Body November Update

All Commercially Available Parts

There are no custom parts, and all parts can be found on the major commercial websites and then some. I’ve done my best to keep soldering to a minimum and only use through hole components for ease of assembly and not requiring any expensive tools or more than basic technical skills. This way, anybody with $50USD can build a basic robot that can be customized and added according to their tastes and skill level. This isn’t an over simplified toy that you can’t really do much with, but a basic robot that you can modify it through adding devices and by altering it’s code.

Advanced Features

Through hardware and coding, this robot will have many advanced features such as encoders, a range finder, monitoring and updating via wifi, have it’s own webserver, battery management, having a lot of I/O pins and programming space. It’s all possible due to inexpensive parts and using two popular microcontrollers that compliment each other quite well, in my opinion.

Argh! Brains! Argh!

I know it’s not October any longer, but I couldn’t resist. The robot will not be lacking for computing power, though. One is an Arduino Uno, which uses a robust atmel single chip computer and the other is a WeMos Mini Pro that uses an ESP822-12 board that has built in wife. Both can use sketches made on Arduino IDE, which is a plus. They each have their strengths and weaknesses, but together they make for a very robust package.

The main strengths of the Arduino is the amount and types of I/O pins that provide digital, I2C, analog, PWM and more through it’s onboard firmware that is built in, and a decent microprocessor that is fairly quick at 16Mhz. It’s only real weaknesses are the amount of programming space, which is limited to 32K and that isn’t bad, since you can pick up a good clone for about $10USD.

Where the Arduino Uno style boards lack memory, the ESP8266-12 based microcontrollers more than make up for it, with 4 or more MB of memory and being Wi-Fi enabled, but most of it’s I/O pins are digital, with one PWM and an analog pin, which makes it’s an awesome board for IoT and such.

Looking at IoT sites is where I came up with the idea of using an ESP8266 based board to to monitor and control the robot with. Once I started playing with it, I realized that it had way more potential that I had first thought. At 60Mhz and have 4MB it’s going to run circles around the Arduino and will have higher level duties such as webserver, host any artificial neural networks, data logging, and host any large files such as maps, etc.,.

A Pic of the Robot sans wires

Waiting on a delivery of Dupont style connectors to wire up the sensors, etc. Will be soldering the headers for the WeMos on the shield this weekend.

A Rather Busy Week

Progress and Such

It’s been a rather hectic week, trying to get enough dry goods to last for awhile and get some work done on a few projects, has been quite challenging since it’s getting hot and going into any store requires a mask. Both even together are not bad, but combined with humidity, it does complicate things, quite a bit. Plus, doing the exchange of effort for monetary gain was a good thing, as well. Most can’t wait for things to go back to the good ol’ days, but I’m beginning to believe that they are gone for good and this is the new normal. By the way, feeling much better than last week, was out and about in the heat a bit too much, I guess.

Off to more fun topics, though. Mr. Robot has tracks and a chassis now, and the hydroponics mini lab is coming along fine.

Mr. Robot Has Bod!

Got another track set made and sealed the ends and the chassis modified and printed. I found the 6V-12V motors that will fit in the Tamiya Dual Gear Drive kit and the Line Follower kit came in, as well. So, just need to hook those to an Arduino and a Dual H-Bridge for the coding to begin.

Mr. Robot's grey tracks and orange chassis

Plenty of internal storage for things like battery banks, the line follower kit and the dual drive motor kit, and maybe a few small sensors. This coming week, I’d like to get the battery banks done, at the very least designed. I’ve gone with this particular layout, because it’s quite modular and when I change or add things, I don’t have to reprint an entire chassis and such. This is very much a rough draft.

Hydroponics Laboratory Update

Got the base done last weekend and let it dry completely outside for a few days, it came out rather well since I’m not a great carpenter, mediocre would be a better term for my carpentry skills(smile). I did mount the stand on it, hung the grow light and put the seedlings under it. I had tried a method of growing the seedling using a compact fluorescent light, but they really did not take to it, very well.

It may just be my lack of skill, or too much water or something else. It looks like the kale, cherry tomatoes and the marigolds made it, though. It was not a complete failure, I should water less and use a grow light for seedlings, especially for indoor hydroponics. I’d thought of putting it outside, but figured that the heat would have destroyed the seedlings’ chances altogether.

DIY grow tent out of mylar sheeting to reflect back the light from the grow light for the plants to absorb

The frame was mounted on the base, and the next experiment is in progress, which is the grow tent. I did tape the mylar sheeting to the outside of the frame, and it’s not entirely transparent, but let’s just say that my living room has a creepy purplish glow to it in the evening till the timer shuts off.

Some future goals are:

  • Wash the hydroton
  • Set up a way to measure the water/nutrient level of the reservoir
  • Print the venturi tube for the pump system
  • Upgrade the frame to thicker tubing